Sunday, November 19, 2017

Detroit's Blessed Solanus Casey beatified!


Detroit's Capuchin friar, Fr. Solanus Casey (1870-1957), was beatified on Saturday, November 18th, at Ford Field, the home of the Detroit Lions. There were reportedly upwards of 70,000 people there. I'm sure some wondered whether a football game they hadn't heard about was in progress! What a fantastic event! Here's a picture of how it looked inside Ford Field 2 days ago where the beatification Mass was celebrated:

It's almost Thanksgiving ... and Fr. Perrone goes to Confession!

Fr. Eduard Perrone, "A Pastor's Descant" (Assumption Grotto News, November 19, 2017)
This week we observe the second of the three great holidays, Thanksgiving Day. Second? Yes, when one figures in Halloween which, according to news reports, is the second most celebrated American holiday, second only to the December one which everyone used to call Christmas. (Word is out that President Trump has declared that it's once again OK to say, "Merry Christmas." That may be reassuring to some, but to those who never championed political correctness it is, in an ironic bit of pointing the finger, "fake news.")

Thanksgiving Day is worthy of Christian endorsement so long as we recall that there's an object to our thanks -- namely God -- to whom we owe our very existence as well as everything we have. As I remarked in a pastor's column of some past year, secular society gladly embraces Thanksgiving Day for its commercial potential (kicking off, as they say, the holiday spending spree) and for the momentary reprieve of work. One may openly express thankfulness for anything whatever if it is left unsaid that the gratitude must be direct to the Almighty.


Just this past week I made thanksgiving to God for one of the most precious of His gifts to me as a Catholic: the absolution of my sins. (In case you didn't know, priests not only hear confessions but make themselves penitents of other priests.) It so happened that this confession was in close proximity to my birthday (the admission of which is not meant to cue a raucous rendition of the familiar dirge). Confession, I would say, is a great Catholic way of celebrating one's birthday, compelling one to recollect one's utter dependence upon God for forgiveness, for His grace, for life itself. Going to confession ought not to make one grumpy and cross. I'm reminded of what I once read about a composer Igor Stravinsky who would faithfully go to confession on his birthday, the prospect of which would put the composer, in his own words, "in a mood," that is, crabby.

The confession of my sins reminds me of my lowly place under God's infinitely vast empire and that I must ever be grateful to Him for His merciful indulgence to my sinful self. Going to confession also reminds me of what it is to be a penitent in my confessional who must not only accuse himself of his sins before God, but who must also own up to his wrongdoings before a priest, one who is as fallible as another -- so that I will not easily to be compassionate and understanding of penitents. I have posted a few choice scriptural quotes on the door of my confessional. These help me to be kindly disposed to those beggars of divine mercy who come to me to be freed of the burden of their consciences. Should ever I fail in this and get uppity or impatient with you in confession, do me the charity of asking me to read the bible verses on my confessional door. That should awaken a needed humility and spare me a severe judgment from the Judge of judges.

Last week's somewhat panicky pastor's Descant forecasting a gloomy future for our parish Forty Hours devotion appears to have been overwrought. Attendance for the closing Mass at noon last Sunday was good and there always seemed to be someone adoring our Lord during the hours of Exposition. The real credit for the devotion, of course, goes to the benevolent Christ who makes Himself and His graces available during this sacred time. I want to make the Forty Hours a great spiritual success for our people and I would be sad to let go of it when we have held on to it so tenaciously these many years. Accordingly, I have asked a small committee to be formed for securing the future of the Forty Hourse Devotion in our parish. They would meet in September next year to plan for a greater participation and greater solemnity for this traditional parish service.

You will note the near completion of the handicapped entrance ramp on the church's south side, a project that has taken an unduly long time to come to completion. If its serviceability matches its fine looks, I would say that we will have a worthy addition -- or rather replacement entryway -- to our majestic church structure.

Fr. Perrone

Why traditional Catholic devotions are disappearing even from traditional parishes

One problem is that most traditional parishes tend to be "commuter parishes," whose members live at considerable distance from the churches. But listen in as a trusted pastor discusses the challenge today:

Fr. Eduard Perrone, "A Pastor's Descant" (Assumption Grotto News, November 12, 2017)
I've been toying with the idea of dropping the annual parish Forty Hours Devotion, beginning next year. The reason would only be lack of patronage. Grotto has offered this period of Eucharistic adoration for as long as anyone can remember. The Forty Hours Devotion reflects a time in the Archdiocese when this was practiced in every parish in its turn. The effect diocese-wide was that somewhere and at all times there was Eucharistic exposition. A lot has happened since those more reverent times. For one thing, Vatican Ii happened and this worldwide devotion was more or less dropped in favor of an indeterminate annual "Eucharistic day" which every parish was encouraged to host. With the decrease of Eucharistic devotion this became a dead letter in most places, though Grotto carried on with the Forty Hours. Suddenly there arose a wave of adoration in special parish chapels where the Blessed Sacrament would be exposed for some hours daily or even around the clock. A boon to adoration this was indeed, but it generally rendered those Eucharistic Days and the Forty Hours superfluous. While several parishes in the archdiocese have adoration chapels, there are almost none that have solemn public days of adoration, let alone the Forty Hours.


Forty Hours procession at St. John Cantius in Chicago

Another factor in the demise of the Forty Hours Devotion was the diminishing number of Catholic schools and the ruination of once highly Catholic neighborhoods around their parishes. The once tighly knit communities that gave rise to the parishes were a boon to adoration of the Holy Sacrament. Distances to the churches then were short and the presence of children in the parish schools supplied a steady stream of adorers.

We've had our parish adoration chapel going for nearly as long as I have been pastor. At one time we had less of a difficulty filling time slots for adoration. We barely succeed in having sufficient worshippers, but their number is small. Our people live far away from the parish and often have access to adoration places closer to home than Assumption Grotto Church. (Most people, however, do not practice a weekly holy hour of adoration.)

In the heyday, Forty Hours was a special celebration for a parish. There were processions and litanies. Altar boys in groups of two were assigned half-hour periods of adoration. A banner was placed over the front church doors of the church which announced to the neighborhood that this was the time of Forty Hours. Sermons on the Holy Eucharist were given. People came in great numbers to the solemn closing ceremony, and dozens of priests participated in it, followed or preceded by a grand dinner for the priests which was a confirmation of priestly fraternity. We have limped on with the Forty hours for a long time through interest wand attendance for it have been dwindling.

There is a Church law which forbids the Holy Eucharist to remain exposed without adorers being present. I'm not wholly sure that this has been honored all the time. Sometimes I or Fr. John or some single person have been the only ones present at a given time.

Having given all that preliminary information, I will assess the success of this year's Forty Hours. I do believe that it gives honor and glory to God, but only if there are people present doing the praying and adoring the Lord.


Forty Hours closing Mass at the London Oratory

Today [Nov. 12th] at the noon Mass we will have the solemn ceremonial as prescribed by the Forty Hours ritual. I hope the three days will be a success and warrant our continued practice of this venerable custom. If not, we will have to bid the Forty Hours Devotion a sad but fond farewell. It had nourished Eucharistic piety in the people of this parish for many generations. Let us see in what direction we must head in the years to come.

Tridentine Community News - Tridentine Mass Celebrant Training in Saint John, New Brunswick and Medford, Oregon; Solemn High Mass at National Catholic Youth Conference; Local TLM schedule for this coming week


"I will go in unto the Altar of God
To God, Who giveth joy to my youth"

Tridentine Community News by Alex Begin (November 19, 2017):
November 19, 2017 – Resumed Sixth Sunday After Epiphany

Tridentine Mass Celebrant Training in Saint John, New Brunswick and Medford, Oregon

The last few months have brought more interest from priests interested in learning to celebrate the Traditional Latin Mass. Publicized on the web site and in certain episodes of Extraordinary Faith, the training only requires two days for priests to learn to celebrate their first Mass. Priests need only provide essential Mass supplies; there is no cost for training materials, time, or travel.

For a variety of reasons, some priest students request to keep their participation in the class confidential. Most, however, are thrilled to be able to provide the Extraordinary Form to their flocks and to help their own spiritual growth as priests. Three recent participants in the training in particular stand out:

Fr. Peter Melanson, Pastor of Holy Trinity Church near downtown Saint John, New Brunswick, is a graduate of London, Ontario’s St. Peter’s Seminary. With the support of his bishop, he is starting the first regular Latin Mass in his part of Canada in over 45 years. Having only taken the training in August, Fr. Melanson has already begun weekly Sunday 12:30 PM Low Masses at Holy Trinity on October 29. A page on the parish web site is dedicated to this new initiative: http://holytrinitysj.com/latinmass/

Fr. Shane McKee, Associate Pastor of Sacred Heart of Jesus Church in downtown Medford, Oregon, and Fr. Ben Tapia, Pastor of Shepherd of the Valley Church in Central Point Oregon, this past week took part in a training session at Sacred Heart Church arranged by Don Haverkamp and Mike Ford of Southern Oregon Una Voce. Don and Mike were the organizers of the sold-out Sacred Liturgy Conference held at Sacred Heart Church this past summer, which Cardinal Burke, Archbishop Cordileone, and other luminaries attended. Fr. Shane and Fr. Ben will be joining the roster of priests offering the Traditional Mass in the Medford area, with the intent of expanding the frequency of its availability.

Priests interested in learning the Tridentine Mass are invited to e-mail info@extraordinaryfaith.tv for more information about the training program.

Solemn High Mass at National Catholic Youth Conference

The below, printed verbatim from Gregory DiPippo’s post on the New Liturgical Movement blog, further demonstrates the growing influence and presence of the Traditional Latin Mass at mainstream Catholic events:
“Every two years, over 25,000 young people attend the National Catholic Youth Conference (NCYC), which for the past three years has been held in Indianapolis at Lucas Oil Stadium and the Convention Center. This year there will be a Solemn High Mass in the Extraordinary Form offered at NCYC. Two years ago, a Missa Cantata was celebrated at the conference, and it drew such a large crowd that there were more people overflowing outside of the small chapel than inside the chapel itself.

The Mass has been moved to a larger room this year, and a portable reredos and communion rail are being built for the chapel. Please spread the word to those you know who might be attending NCYC; this will be a great opportunity for young people to experience the Traditional Rite of the Mass at such a large gathering. The Mass will be held in the NCYC Adoration Chapel in the Indianapolis Convention Center on Friday, November 17th at 11:30am.”
This is, of course, an encouraging development, but what’s still missing is any official acknowledgement from the U.S. or Canadian Conferences of Catholic Bishops that Tradition has any real role in evangelizing the young. One wonders just why this never seems to be a part of the official party line. Perhaps bishops and their staffs don’t realize that laser light shows and praise-and-worship music don’t appeal to everyone’s spiritual sensitivities.

Tridentine Masses This Coming Week
  • Mon. 11/20 7:00 PM: Low Mass at St. Josaphat (St. Felix of Valois, Confessor)
  • Tue. 11/21 7:00 PM: Low Mass at Holy Name of Mary, Windsor (Presentation of the Blessed Virgin Mary)
  • Sat. 11/25 8:30 AM: Low Mass at Miles Christi (St. Catherine of Alexandria, Virgin & Martyr)
[Comments? Please e-mail tridnews@detroitlatinmass.org. Previous columns are available at http://www.detroitlatinmass.org. This edition of Tridentine Community News, with minor editions, is from the St. Albertus (Detroit), Academy of the Sacred Heart (Bloomfield Hills), and St. Alphonsus and Holy Name of Mary Churches (Windsor) bulletin inserts for November 12, 2017. Hat tip to Alex Begin, author of the column.]

Record attendance at chant workshop in Detroit (upwards of 100 attendees)!

I want to make sure nobody missed this from the previous post:
A special thank-you to all those who made time to attend Wassim Sarweh’s most recent Gregorian Chant Workshop on October 28. Attendance was almost triple the previous local record, and arguably was among the highest ever seen for a comparable event in North America: Old St. Mary’s Parish had set a limit of 75 attendees; all reservations on Eventbrite had been claimed, plus there were several walk-ins on the day of the class. Approximately 20 additional faithful attended the associated 2:00 PM Tridentine Mass without attending the seminar. Not surprisingly, the parish has asked Wassim to hold another Chant Workshop in 2018.

Perhaps most notably, many of the attendees were choir directors themselves. This certainly bodes well for the (re)introduction of chant in parish repertoires.

Catching up: Tridente Community News from Nov. 12th!


"I will go in unto the Altar of God
To God, Who giveth joy to my youth"

Tridentine Community News by Alex Begin (November 12, 2017):
November 12, 2017 – Twenty-third Sunday After Pentecost

Record Attendance at Chant Workshop

A special thank-you to all those who made time to attend Wassim Sarweh’s most recent Gregorian Chant Workshop on October 28. Attendance was almost triple the previous local record, and arguably was among the highest ever seen for a comparable event in North America: Old St. Mary’s Parish had set a limit of 75 attendees; all reservations on Eventbrite had been claimed, plus there were several walk-ins on the day of the class. Approximately 20 additional faithful attended the associated 2:00 PM Tridentine Mass without attending the seminar. Not surprisingly, the parish has asked Wassim to hold another Chant Workshop in 2018.

Perhaps most notably, many of the attendees were choir directors themselves. This certainly bodes well for the (re)introduction of chant in parish repertoires.

Mass at St. Hyacinth Church on December 3

Detroit’s historic St. Hyacinth Church will hold its next Tridentine High Mass on Sunday, December 3 at 1:30 PM. The Mass will be offered by Fr. Stephen Wolfe, SJ, the recently-ordained Jesuit who has enthusiastically joined our roster of local TLM celebrants.

St. Hyacinth is one of metro Detroit’s best-preserved churches, with a stunningly decorated interior incorporating mosaics and painted domes [pictured]. Recently its High Altar underwent a restorative repainting.

From 10:00 AM – 1:00 PM that day, St. Hyacinth also will host a Brunch with St. Nicholas in the school hall. Flyers describing the event are available after Mass at the OCLMA/Academy of the Sacred Heart, St. Alphonsus, and Holy Name of Mary Churches.

Prayer for the Queen: The Dómine, Salvam Fac

The media has always been fascinated with the British Royal Family. If your travels will be taking you to England, you might be interested to know that the following Prayer for the Queen (or King) is specified to be prayed after Sunday High Masses, in much the same way that we have a custom of Prayers After Low Mass in the universal Church.

This prayer can be sung as well as recited; recordings of both polyphonic and Gregorian versions of the Dómine, salvam fac can be found on YouTube. The Gregorian version is normally sung after Latin Masses, a recording of which is here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9nLNP8sz2F4

℣. Dómine, salvam fac regínam nostram Elísabeth.
. Et exáudi nos in die, qua invocavérimus te.

Orémus. Quaésumus, omnípotens Deus, ut fámula tua Elísabeth regína nostra, qui tua miseratióne suscépit regni gubernácula, virtútum étiam ómnium percípiat increménta; quibus decénter ornáta, et vitiórum monstra devitáre, et ad te, qui via, véritas, et vita es, cum príncipe consórte et prole régia, gratiósa váleat perveníre. Per Christum Dóminum nostrum.

. Amen.

. O Lord, save Elizabeth our Queen.
. And hear us in the day when we call upon Thee.

Let us pray. Almighty God, we pray for Thy servant Elizabeth our Queen, now by Thy mercy reigning over us. Adorn her yet more with every virtue, remove all evil from her path, that with her consort, and all the royal family she may come at last in grace to Thee, Who art the way, the truth, and the life. Through Christ our Lord.
. Amen.

Other countries pray versions of this prayer adapted for their own king or queen.

The Dómine, salvam fac demonstrates in a formal, liturgical way our obligation to pray for our leaders, no matter what faith they may espouse.

Tridentine Masses This Coming Week
  • Mon. 11/13 7:00 PM: Low Mass at St. Josaphat (St. Frances Xavier Cabrini, Virgin)
  • Tue. 11/14 7:00 PM: Low Mass at Holy Name of Mary, Windsor (St. Josaphat, Bishop & Martyr)
  • Sat. 11/18 8:30 AM: Low Mass at Miles Christi (Dedication of the Basilicas of Ss. Peter & Paul)
[Comments? Please e-mail tridnews@detroitlatinmass.org. Previous columns are available at http://www.detroitlatinmass.org. This edition of Tridentine Community News, with minor editions, is from the St. Albertus (Detroit), Academy of the Sacred Heart (Bloomfield Hills), and St. Alphonsus and Holy Name of Mary Churches (Windsor) bulletin inserts for January 4, 2017. Hat tip to Alex Begin, author of the column.]

Saturday, November 18, 2017

Tridentine Masses coming this week to metro Detroit and eastern Michigan


Tridentine Masses This Coming Week

Sunday


Monday


Tuesday


Wednesday


Thursday


Friday


Saturday


* NB: The SSPX chapels among those Mass sites listed above are posted here because the Holy Father has announced that "those who during the Holy Year of Mercy approach these priests of the Fraternity of St Pius X to celebrate the Sacrament of Reconciliation shall validly and licitly receive the absolution of their sins," and subsequently extended this privilege beyond the Year of Mercy. These chapels are not listed among the approved parishes and worship sites on archdiocesan websites.

Very interesting: "The EF and the New Age"

This article conjoins the unexpected topic of the New Age with a seemingly-unlikely mate, the Extraordinary Form of the Catholic liturgy, not any sense to conflate the two, but to show why those attracted to the New Age (and here there are many historical examples) have found or can find what they thought they were looking for in the transcendent liturgy of antiquity: "FIUV Position Paper: Joseph Shaw, "The EF and the New Age" (Rorate Caeli, November 18, 2017).

Sunday, November 12, 2017

Tridentine Masses coming this week to metro Detroit and east Michigan


Tridentine Masses This Coming Week

Sunday


Monday


Tuesday


Wednesday


Thursday


Friday


Saturday


* NB: The SSPX chapels among those Mass sites listed above are posted here because the Holy Father has announced that "those who during the Holy Year of Mercy approach these priests of the Fraternity of St Pius X to celebrate the Sacrament of Reconciliation shall validly and licitly receive the absolution of their sins," and subsequently extended this privilege beyond the Year of Mercy. These chapels are not listed among the approved parishes and worship sites on archdiocesan websites.

Sunday, November 05, 2017

Fr. Perrone: Why pray for the dead?

Eduard Perrone, "A Pastor's Descant" (Assumption Grotto News, November 5, 2017):
What we know about life after death pales in comparison with what we do not know. There are so many unanswered questions. Our Lord Himself spoke of the next life in similes, leaving us to glean a literal understanding from the imagery therein. Although the church has officially said relatively little about the souls of the deceased as being in this world (think of ghosts, apparitions of and licit communications with the dead through prayer), we have some hints that the matter may be much more complex than the little doctrinal surety we have about these matters. Upon the death of our Lord, for example, it is written that many holy souls arose from their graves and appeared to many on earth (Mt. 27:53). In our time we have testimony from a convincing number of persons who have had 'near death' experiences in which their souls seem to have hovered over and about their not-quite-yet-dead bodies. How much is fantasy, how much deception, how much undefined truth is unsure. Our doctrinal certainty on the condition of the dead is rather succinct: after the particular judgment there is heaven, or hell, or purgatory. The rest is not specified.

Holy Church however has always prayed for the souls of the faithful departed, that is, for those who were once living members of the Church on earth but who may now, after death, be in need of our prayers. Canonized saints are excluded from this prayer since it is certain that they have successfully achieved their place and their state cannot improve. Likewise, the souls of the damned cannot be ransomed by any degree of supplication for them. Only the souls of the dead in purgatory can profit from our Masses, indulgences, and other prayers and good works offered for their amelioration.


At one time in rather recent history -- before Vatican II -- Catholics had a more manifest devotion to the "poor souls" in purgatory. Ever since the near demise of the Requiem Mass (the Mass for the dead, revived only ten years ago by Pope Benedict XVI by permitting the return of the traditional Latin Mass), Catholics seem to have forgotten that purgatory is a solemnly proclaimed dogma of the Church (which, therefore, no Catholic can deny and yet remain a Catholic) and that Masses and prayers for the dead are a real benefit to those in purgatory, enabling them to be released the sooner from the just punishments they suffer as a result of their sins. (For the uninformed: the daily black vestment Requiem Mass was a common occurrence before the Council; there were in some churches so-called 'privileged altars' where indulgences for the dead were secured; litanies and other prayers for the dead were commonly recited; and people customarily arranged for Masses to be said for their beloved deceased.) With the loss of the doctrinal instruction, today's modern Catholics have the erroneous assumption that nearly everybody goes directly to heaven after death. Given the infallibility of the Church's dogma regarding the existence of purgatory it would be at least negligent, if not cruel, to omit praying for the souls detained in this transcendent 'prison' (cf. Mt 5:25). How many of our beloved may be in need of assistance from the church on earth? With the facile dismissal of the doctrine of purgatory that help will not be forthcoming.


This entire month is set aside to remember the dead and to alleviate their sufferings. It has been estimated that the pains of purgatory are more intense than any known in this life. When one considers the excruciating possibilities of present pains, that's a staggering amount. Charity ought to motivate us to assist souls who have no means to help themselves.

God in His mercy provided a place of temporary punishment for sin which we call purgatory. Let us be grateful that we can help the poor souls by our works.

This weekend our parish will have the 40 Hours of adoration of the Blessed Sacrament. We open this on Friday after the 7:30 Mass until 7:00 p.m. It continues on Saturday after the 7:30 a.m. Mass until 7:00 p.m. Next Sunday adoration takes place only in short intervals between Masses and concludes with the solemn high Mass at noon, followed by the procession with the Blessed Sacrament. Plan this weekend on being in church for one hour of prayer besides your usual weekend Mass time.

Fr. Perrone

My dear Wormwood, ...

... I note what you say about guiding your patient’s reading and taking care that he sees a good deal of his materialist friend. But are you not being a trifle naïf ? It sounds as if you supposed that argument was the way to keep him out of the Enemy’s clutches. That might have been so if he had lived a few centuries earlier. At that time the humans still knew pretty well when a thing was proved and when it was not; and if it was proved they really believed it. They still connected thinking with doing and were prepared to alter their way of life as the result of a chain of reasoning. But what with the weekly press and other such weapons we have largely altered that. Your man has been accustomed, ever since he was a boy, to have a dozen incompatible philosophies dancing about together inside his head. He doesn’t think of doctrines as primarily “true” or “false”, but as “academic” or “practical”, “outworn” or “contemporary”, “conventional” or “ruthless”. Jargon, not argument, is your best ally in keeping him from the Church. Don’t waste time trying to make him think that materialism is true ! Make him think it is strong, or stark, or courageous — that it is the philosophy of the future. That’s the sort of thing he cares about.

The trouble about argument is that it moves the whole struggle onto the Enemy’s own ground. He can argue too; whereas in really practical propaganda of the kind I am suggesting He has been shown for centuries to be greatly the inferior of Our Father Below. By the very act of arguing, you awake the patient’s reason; and once it is awake, who can foresee the result? Even if a particular train of thought can be twisted so as to end in our favour, you will find that you have been strengthening in your patient the fatal habit of attending to universal issues and withdrawing his attention from the stream of immediate sense experiences. Your business is to fix his attention on the stream. Teach him to call it “real life” and don’t let him ask what he means by “real”.
Related:
[From C. S. Lewis, Screwtape Letters (New York: Macmillan Co., 1947), pp. 11-12; republished online (Samizdat University Press, 2016).]

Tridentine Community News - Upcoming talks and receptions at the Oakland County Latin Mass Association; Christmas week bus tour of historic churches in Chicago; local TLM schedule


"I will go in unto the Altar of God
To God, Who giveth joy to my youth"

Tridentine Community News by Alex Begin (November 5, 2017):
November 5, 2017 - Twenty-second Sunday After Pentecost

Upcoming Talks & Receptions at the Oakland County Latin Mass Association

Speakers have been lined up for several of the upcoming monthly receptions that follow the Sunday 9:45 AM Oakland County Latin Mass Association Masses at the Academy of the Sacred Heart Chapel in Bloomfield Hills:

November 19: Fr. John Ezratty, MC will present a reflection about discerning the will of God for one’s life. Fr. Ezratty is a priest of Miles Christi, an order dedicated to the sanctification of the laity. As part of his ministry, he provides spiritual direction, conducts the Ignatian Spiritual Exercises, and assists laypeople with building their own personal relationships with our Lord.

December 10: Erik Coules, Regional Coordinator with the Archdiocese of Detroit Department of Parish Life & Services

January 7: Dr. Robert Fastiggi, Professor of Systematic Theology at Sacred Heart Major Seminary, will speak on The Sacrament of Reconciliation: Some Historical and Theological Reflections. Dr. Fastiggi’s most recent book, published in March, 2017, is The Sacrament of Reconciliation: An Anthropological and Scriptural Understanding.

March 4, 2018: Fr. Stephen Wolfe, SJ will discuss Ignatian methods of prayer. Recently-ordained Fr. Wolfe is an enthusiastic celebrant of the Traditional Mass.

June 3: Following the offering one of his first Masses after ordination for the OCLMA, soon-to-be Fr. Graham Latimer, FSSP will speak on Vocation to the Priesthood. Fr. Latimer is originally from metro Detroit, and his family attends the OCLMA.

Christmas Week Bus Tour of Historic Churches in Chicago

A perennial favorite, Prayer Pilgrimages’ annual Christmas week bus tour to Chicago will be held this year Thursday-Saturday, December 28-30. Chicago is blessed with one of the world’s most impressive collections of well-preserved historic churches.

This year we have an embarrassment of riches, as more historic churches have welcomed our bus tour to hold Tridentine Masses than we have days to accommodate all of them. We are particularly privileged that two of them have invited us to hold the first Tridentine Masses in their churches in over 45 years. Fr. Louis Madey will once again serve as chaplain and celebrant of the Extraordinary Form Masses on this year’s tour, supported by the choir from St. Joseph Oratory and altar servers from the St. Benedict Tridentine Community.

Tour flyers will be distributed after Mass at Old St. Mary’s in Detroit, at the OCLMA/Academy in Bloomfield Hills, and at St. Alphonsus and Holy Name of Mary Churches in Windsor. For more information or to register, visit www.prayerpilgrimages.com or call tour organizer Michael Semaan at (248) 250-6005.

Stops this year will include the busy Polish parish, St. Hyacinth Basilica [photo, below, by Jonathon Brust]:


Our Lady of Sorrows Basilica, with its arcade of Side Altars [photo, below, by Krzysztof Hanusiak]:


And this writer’s personal favorite, the eye-poppingly gorgeous St. Mary of the Angels, below, where everything from the art to the lighting to the glistening floor gives glory to God.


Tridentine Masses This Coming Week
  • Mon. 11/06 7:00 PM: Low Mass at St. Josaphat (Feria)
  • Tue. 11/07 7:00 PM: Low Mass at Holy Name of Mary, Windsor (Votive Mass for the Unity of the Church)
  • Sat. 11/11 8:30 AM: Low Mass at Miles Christi (St. Martin of Tours, Bishop & Confessor)
[Comments? Please e-mail tridnews@detroitlatinmass.org. Previous columns are available at http://www.detroitlatinmass.org. This edition of Tridentine Community News, with minor editions, is from the St. Albertus (Detroit), Academy of the Sacred Heart (Bloomfield Hills), and St. Alphonsus and Holy Name of Mary Churches (Windsor) bulletin inserts for November 5, 2017. Hat tip to Alex Begin, author of the column.]

Tridentine Masses coming this week to metro Detroit and east Michigan


Tridentine Masses This Coming Week

Sunday


Monday


Tuesday


Wednesday


Thursday


Friday


Saturday


* NB: The SSPX chapels among those Mass sites listed above are posted here because the Holy Father has announced that "those who during the Holy Year of Mercy approach these priests of the Fraternity of St Pius X to celebrate the Sacrament of Reconciliation shall validly and licitly receive the absolution of their sins," and subsequently extended this privilege beyond the Year of Mercy. These chapels are not listed among the approved parishes and worship sites on archdiocesan websites.

Sunday, October 29, 2017

Dueling feastdays

"Why did Pope Pius XI, when he established the Feast of the Kingship of Our Lord Jesus Christ with his encyclical Quas Primas un 1925, not choose for it the last Sunday of the liturgical year (as Paul VI did later for his new mass), but rather the Last Sunday in October?" asks New Catholic over at Rorate Caeli. The answer comes from an article by Peter Kwasniewski, "Should the Feast of Christ the King Be Celebrated in October or November?" (Oct. 22, 2014), and it seems to be that the placement of the Feast of Christ the King in the liturgical calendar was, at least in part, inspired as a counter-point against the widespread Protestant commemoration on October 31st of the Protestant Reformation, which the Catholic world has traditionally viewed as being, in some sense, a catastrophe.

Fr. Perrone: a father's worry over his children's spiritual future

Fr. Eduard Perrone, "A Pastor's Descant" (Assumption Grotto News, October 29, 2017):
A priest is rightly called father because he has a spiritual progeny, his people, a family he was given through mother Church. Being a parent of sorts, the priest has duties toward his children, to provide for them in the things of the spirit. Dispensing the sacraments and imparting instruction through preaching and teaching are the most necessary of his duties. As parenting in its ordinary sense entials more than ensuring that basic necessities are met, so the priest-father has more to do than fulfillment of the fundamentals of pastoral care. Among these extras is his parental duty to worry. No parent worthy of the name passes his days without anxiety for the welfare of his children. Their good health, proper education, safety, and that personal security which makes for happiness are surely among things parents often worry about in regard to their children.

So do I, a spiritual father, worry about my parishioners' spiritual welfare. In particular, I have spiritual concern over what may happen to them in the times ahead. The present moment may be secure enough, but the prognosis is not good. Every good parent does his best to get his children off to a good start in the early years of his children's lives. The time inevitably comes when children become young adults and must fend for themselves in a highly troubled world and amidst "a crooked and perverse generation" (Phil 2:15). Looking ahead I do not see good days for the Church. While there are some signs of betterment for Christians in American society, these are tenuous and fragile. In our beloved Church, signs are less promising for a restoration of stability and clear doctrine. Moral permissiveness and equivocation in teaching seem to be getting the upper hand as the pope and many bishops, theologians, and a number of priests teach ambiguously or even outright falsely, giving grave scandal. It pains me even to mention this yet I'm aware that my people cannot be unmindful of at least some of what's been said and done due to professional and social media. Best efforts have been made to 'put a good spin' on what's been happening from the highest to the local parish levels of the Church. A time comes, however, when the obvious conclusions must be drawn and one must come to grips with the harsh reality of a Church already sharply divided over what is authentic Catholic teaching on moral living and ecclesiastical discipline. And here my parental worry kicks in. How will my parishioners fare if and when a schism (rupture) breaks out in the Church and one must make a declaration of where one stands? What principles will be employed in making that decision? Social pressure to conform? The measure of one's own evil tendencies? The bad example of some of the hierarchy? I think of the heartbreak of Christ when He asked: "Will you also leave Me?" or the foreboding in His rhetorical question: "When the Son of Man comes again will He find faith on earth?" Sadness grips me when I hear the blatant lies being spread about doctrine and right morals. My predecessors in this parish and I have tried to do our paternal duty towards our spiritual children in teaching the truth and encouraging our people to live by it. This must be an ongoing task for the priest, especially in view of the mighty leftist propaganda. The natural tendency in nature is towards dissolution rather than towards betterment, unless a counterforce is exerted. In other words, things by themselves don't get better and better but rather progressively worse when unattended. With the present weak leadership in the Church and the corruptive influence of the media, that needed force is not to be presumed.

The disciples once asked our Lord, "Will only few be saved?" Divine Wisdom did not give a direct answer. The incertitude over the outcome of salvation ought to stir up some salutary worry. While the true Church cannot die and while Christ will ever remain with it until time's end, there is no surety of any particular person being among the saved. And so, I will worry and pray for my parishioners.

I must set aside these dark ruminations to speak of some upcoming dates. Wednesday this week will be All Saints Day, a holy day of obligation. Masses will e at 6:30, 9:30, noon, and 7:00 p.m. Thursday is All Souls Day. Masses will be offered in the morning at 7:30, 8:15, 8:00, 10:00, 11:00, 11:30 and 7:00 p.m. Everybody should participate at Mass on that day -- or better, at several Masses, praying for the dead. (Communion may only be received up to two times per day, but one may assist at Mass without any limit.) Visits to the cemetery with prayers for the dead during the first eight days of November may gain aa plenary indulgence for them.

Get yourselves ready to engage in the annual parish Forty Hours Devotion,a time for the whole parish to adore the Blessed Sacrament. Every individual in the parish ought to spend at least an hour in the church during the time of November 10-11. More on this next week.

Tridentine Community News - Betty Klink, RIP; All Saints & All Souls Day Mass Schedules; Plenary Indulgence Opportunities for November; TLM schedule this coming week


"I will go in unto the Altar of God
To God, Who giveth joy to my youth"

Tridentine Community News by Alex Begin (October 29, 2017):
October 29, 2017 – Christ the King

Betty Klink, RIP

A High Funeral Mass in the Extraordinary Form was offered at the neo-Gothic St. Alphonsus Church in Dearborn, Michigan [pictured] on Wednesday, October 25, 2017 for the repose of the soul of Betty Klink, who passed away the previous Friday. Betty and her late husband Terry were Latin Mass pioneers in metro Detroit, attending and supporting numerous Latin Mass communities.


Betty had struck up friendships with numerous big figures in the Church worldwide, via the old-fashioned technique of typewritten letters. Several years ago, after mentioning to Betty that a rare hymnal was needed to source an obscure hymn, this writer received a copy of that hymnal from none other than EWTN celebrity and Manhattan pastor Fr. George Rutler, one of Betty’s many pen pals. Réquiem ætérnam dona ei, Dómine, et lux perpétua lucéat ei. Requiéscat in pace. Amen.


All Saints & All Souls Day Mass Schedules

All Saints Day, Wednesday, November 1, is a Holy Day of Obligation in the United States (but not in Canada). Tridentine Masses for All Saints Day in our region are listed at the end of this page. Likewise the Mass schedule for All Souls Day, Thursday, November 2, is provided below.

St. Alphonsus Church in Windsor will once again host the Three Masses of All Souls Day, with two simultaneous Low Masses on the Side Altars being offered at 6:00 PM, and a Solemn High Mass with Deacon and Subdeacon at the High Altar at 7:00 PM. The St. Benedict choir will sing the Gregorian Requiem Mass, Mozart’s Lacrimósa, and Duruflé’s Lux Ætérna. Of particular note this year, St. Mary Star of the Sea Church in Jackson, Michigan will also be offering the Three Masses of All Souls for the first time. It is good to see another church in the region take the opportunity to make a spiritual event of this great Feast for the Poor Souls in Purgatory.

Plenary Indulgence Opportunities for November

The month of November brings several opportunities to gain Plenary Indulgences for the Souls in Purgatory:

1. On All Souls Day, a Plenary Indulgence may be gained by praying an Our Father and Creed in a church or public oratory.

2. From November 1-8, inclusive, a Plenary Indulgence may be gained by visiting a cemetery and praying, even only mentally, for the dead.

Only one Plenary Indulgence may be gained per day, under the usual conditions of Confession within 20 days, reception of Holy Communion and prayer for the Holy Father’s intentions once per Plenary Indulgence sought, and freedom from attachment to sin.
Tridentine Masses This Coming Week
  • Mon. 10/30 7:00 PM: Low Mass at St. Josaphat (Feria [Mass of the 21st Sunday After Pentecost])
  • Tue. 10/31 7:00 PM: Low Mass at Holy Name of Mary, Windsor (Feria [Mass of the 21st Sunday After Pentecost])
  • Wed. 11/01 7:30 AM: Low Mass at Assumption Grotto (All Saints)
  • Wed. 11/01 12:00 Noon: Low Mass at St. Joseph (All Saints)
  • Wed. 11/01 5:00 PM: High Mass at St. Mary Star of the Sea, Jackson (All Saints)
  • Wed. 11/01 7:00 PM: High Mass at St. Joseph (All Saints)
  • Wed. 11/01 7:00 PM: High Mass at St. Matthew, Flint (All Saints)
  • Thu. 11/02 7:30 AM: Low Mass at Assumption Grotto (All Souls)
  • Thu. 11/02M: 8:00 AM & 8:40 AM Low Masses, 7:00 PM Solemn High Mass at St. Joseph (All Souls)
  • Thu. 11/02: 6:00 PM Two Low Masses at the Side Altars, 7:00 PM Solemn High Mass at the High Altar at St. Alphonsus, Windsor (All Souls)
  • Thu. 11/02: 6:15 PM Two Low Masses at the Side Altars, 7:00 PM Solemn High Mass at the High Altar at St. Mary Star of the Sea, Jackson (All Souls)
  • Thu. 11/02 7:00 PM: High Mass at St. Matthew, Flint (All Souls)
  • Fri. 11/03 7:00 PM: High Mass at Old St. Mary’s (Votive Mass of the Sacred Heart of Jesus) – Choir will sing Morales’ Missa Caça and Mozart’s Laudáte Dóminum. Devotions to the Sacred Heart prayed before Mass. Reception in the social hall after Mass.
  • Fri. 11/03 7:00 PM: High Requiem Mass at Our Lady of the Scapular, Wyandotte, Michigan (Daily Mass for the Dead)
  • Sat. 11/04 8:30 AM: Low Mass at Miles Christi (St. Charles Borromeo, Bishop & Confessor)
[Comments? Please e-mail tridnews@detroitlatinmass.org. Previous columns are available at http://www.detroitlatinmass.org. This edition of Tridentine Community News, with minor editions, is from the St. Albertus (Detroit), Academy of the Sacred Heart (Bloomfield Hills), and St. Alphonsus and Holy Name of Mary Churches (Windsor) bulletin inserts for October 29, 2017. Hat tip to Alex Begin, author of the column.]

Saturday, October 28, 2017

Tridentine Masses coming this week to metro Detroit and east Michigan


Tridentine Masses This Coming Week

Sunday


Monday


Tuesday


Wednesday (All Saints Day, Nov. 1, 2017)


Thursday (All Souls Day, Nov. 2, 2017)


Friday


Saturday


* NB: The SSPX chapels among those Mass sites listed above are posted here because the Holy Father has announced that "those who during the Holy Year of Mercy approach these priests of the Fraternity of St Pius X to celebrate the Sacrament of Reconciliation shall validly and licitly receive the absolution of their sins," and subsequently extended this privilege beyond the Year of Mercy. These chapels are not listed among the approved parishes and worship sites on archdiocesan websites.

Thursday, October 26, 2017

Fr. Perrone: Divorce

Fr. Eduard Perrone, "A Pastor's Descant" (Assumption Grotto News, October 22, 2017):
This week's subject matter raised another issue upon examination of my relatives in terms of adherence to the Catholic faith. It has to do with the failure of marriages, what we have called, perhaps somewhat euphemistically, divorce. Once a rarely uttered word, like abortion in that remote past time of my life, divorce has inflicted my extended family as it has the general population. While I had intended to make a count of the number of divorces among my relatives I failed to do the needed calculations. Doesn't matter, really. The point is that this cancer has done its share of damage and created an uncomfortable family tension. There are "ex-" husbands and wives and their children who have suffered the consequences of their separated parents. There is the awkwardness of family gatherings, either on account of the missing spouse or else upon his unexpected presence. Most of all for me, there is the matter of the Catholic faith. For us, marriage is not only a lifelong pledged agreement of fidelity and commitment to a life lived in common, it is also a sacrament, a sacred union that derives its lifeblood from Christ. Every Catholic marriage failure is a manifestation of some personal sins, that is, of offenses against God's laws. To glibly ascribe divorce to 'irreconcilable differences' masks the transcendental meaning of divorce as sin. Unlike a so-called private sin, failed marriage does harm to at least one other person, and often to more, and this in the wider family relationships, in society generally, and in the Church specifically. We are a weaker, restive Church for prevalence of divorce since marriage is symbolically a reflection of the undivorceable marriage of Christ and the Church. Our Lord is always the faithful groom, and His people are collectively His bride. He pledged His life in sacrifice to win this spouse for Himself by His meritorious death. He will never retract His marital vows to her. The fidelity of the Church espoused to Christ is expressed in her adhesion to His teachings and in the refusal to prefer sin to His grace. The high incidence of divorce among Catholic spouses is symptomatic of the infidelity of many Catholic people to their baptismal marriage "vows" to Christ. Their total acceptance of Catholic belief (doctrine) and their determined abstention from a sinful manner of life have too often been set aside either for some other religion or for some other way of life. Divorce is only the outward sign of the internal marital infidelity of the Church membership to Christ.

Our familiarity with divorce can inure us to being mindful and sensitive to it symbolic significance in terms of the faith. The response to divorce among Catholic people must always be fidelity to Christ's doctrines and to His commandments. Instead of this only permissible solution, proposals to accommodate our Lord's teachings and His laws are being seriously considered by the pope, some bishops and priests, and by some desperately but deludedly hopeful divorced and re0cohabitating couples (I say not "remarried"). Behind this scandalous suggestion is the idea that if one cannot abide by the law (in this case, divine law) then the law itself should be abrogated, or at least adjusted to present circumstances. This is the most pernicious aspect of what's being advocated by the allowing divorced and re-"married" people (without Church annulment) to receive the sacraments without the necessary requirement of total continence (the non-use of the marital act). The reason why this is so grievous is that, if admitted, it would unravel the whole moral law of God and all the Church discipline concerning what is sacred. In brief, by it the whole Catholic and Christian faith would be cast away. All would be remade or readjusted, as if to force God into submission to man's weaknesses rather than insist on wek man's obedience to God. Thus one would have the triumph of man over God. The great 'divorce' would have been achieved and God's marriage to the church would be undone.

The rebellion against the traditional biblical and ecclesiastical understanding of marriage and the sacraments has seeds in the souls of everyone who regrets the binding force that God's natural law has upon him. It expresses an old resentment that God should make demands upon humanity, demands that defy man's beastly craving for limitless freedom from strictures. Those who decry the outrageous proposals for change in the church's laws governing marriage and the sacraments are those who are themselves beset with the disorder of original sin's residue; yet they rightly insist that God's laws are irrevocable, unreformable by anyone: pope, bishop, layman. In the still raging controversy over Catholic re-"marriage" and reception of the sacraments one ought to take a more inclusive, panoramic view of what this means. It is the preamble to a declaration of war of man against God, of human willfulness over obedience to Him, of a divorce and a riddance of the divine Groom who ever remains faithful despite His spouses' menacing threats of desertion.

Fr. Perrone

Sunday, October 22, 2017

Truth Decay


Yet another angst-ridden message from our underground correspondent, Guy Noir - Private Eye, this time arriving by bicycle courier in a large envelope. The hand-written message, with splotches of ink, made me wonder if Guy had used a quill pen to compose the missive. In the envelope I also found a pack of four Havana cigars. Nice.

Guy's message referenced a piece by Sandro Magister entitled "World's End Update ..." (Settimo Cielo, October 20, 2017), which I tracked down on the internet. Then followed his brief comments:
It's getting old. This new universalism has by now been so often suggested and homaged by so many recent popes that one could honestly argue it's part of the postconciliar development of doctrine. I no longer know what to say. Ralph Martin's "Who Will Be Saved?" offered a complete, Catholic, and biblical response to it. Trouble being, though, as Bishop Barron pointed out in his online debate over Martin's corrective, the conservatives' ballyhoooed Benedict XVI himself seems to support some sort of universalism in his encyclical on hope. We can laud tradition all we want, but at some point have to admit that postconciliarism is often an apology for, versus a friend of, Tradition. When the Four Last Things are shined up with new porcelain theological caps after receiving a Balthasarian root canal, Developmentalism is becoming the new orthodoxy, no matter how hard the forced smile from places like First Things. We are all Mormons now.
So it goes ...

How the Catholic Faith went underground for centuries in Japan and was preserved by the lay faithful


Sandro Magister, "The 'Hidden Christians' of Japan ..." (Settimo Cielo, October 17, 2017):
Pope Francis has repeatedly expressed his admiration for the “hidden Christians” of Japan, who miraculously reappeared with their faith intact in the second half of the nineteenth century, after two and a half centuries of centuries of ferocious annihilation of Christianity in that country.

But few know the real story of this miracle on the brink of the incredible. It was reconstructed on Thursday, October 12 in a fascinating conference in the aula magna of the Pontifical Gregorian University, by the Japanese Jesuit Shinzo Kawamura, professor of Church history at Sophia University in Tokyo and an author of the most up-to-date studies on the issue.

The complete text of his conference, given at the 75th anniversary of diplomatic relations between Japan and the Holy See, is reproduced on this other page of Settimo Cielo:

>> Pope Pius IX and Japan. The History of an Oriental Miracle


An extensive extract from this is published below. From reading this - which is a must - it can be gathered that what allowed the intact transmission of the Catholic faith, from generation to generation, among those Christians devoid of priests and entirely cut off from the world was essentially an oral tradition made up of a few decisive truths concerning the sacraments and in the first place confession, according to what was taught by the Council of Trent.

It is “Tridentine” Catholicism, therefore, that nourished the miracle of those “hidden Christians.” With its doctrine of sin and of sacramental forgiveness, anticipated in them by repeated acts of perfect contrition, in the absence of a confessor but also in the prophetic vision that one day he would finally arrive.

These were acts of contrition that followed, at times, the sin of apostasy, which involved publicly trampling on the “Fumie,” the image of Jesus, as they were forced to do by their persecutors in order to prove that they abjured the Christian faith, on pain of death....

"HIDDEN CHRISTIANS" IN JAPAN. THE HISTORY OF AN ORIENTAL MIRACLE
by Shinzo Kawamura, S.J.

On January 8, 1867, His Holiness Pope Pius IX dispatched a special message to Fr. Bernard Petitjean of the Paris Foreign Mission Society, who at the time was involved in missionary work in the city of Nagasaki. The purpose of His Holiness was to personally bless an event, which he exuberantly described as a “Miracle of the Orient.”

What he referred to as a “Miracle of the Orient,” was the fact that three years before this message was dispatched, that is, on March 17, 1865, an incident had occurred within one of Japan’s oldest churches, namely the “Oura Tenshudo" of Nagasaki, which is also known as the Basilica of the Twenty-Six Holy Martyrs of Japan.

A group of approximately 15 people, descendants of the Hidden Christians of Nagasaki Urakami, visited the Oura Tenshudo that had just been built, and engaged in a dialogue with Fr. Petitjean.

They spoke to Fr. Petitjean saying: “We are of the same faith as you. Where can we find the image of Saint Mary?”.

No sooner had these Hidden Christians ascertained the fact that Catholic priests had entered Japan, more and more of them began to come out of hiding, and their numbers in course of time exceeded ten thousand.

After having duly confirmed the fact that the faith of these priests was the same as that which had been adhered to by their ancestors 400 years ago, these Hidden Christians returned to the Catholic Church.

Three keywords

These Hidden Christians had endured about 250 years of persecution, due to the prohibitions imposed upon them by the Tokugawa government. Even so, they faithfully continued to preserve their faith, and when they eventually felt that the time was appropriate to do so, they rejoined the Catholic Church. This was indeed a miracle, but my question is, what was it that made this miracle possible?

I now wish to present three keywords that I consider most vital, with regard to the possibility of this Oriental Miracle....
Kawamura goes on to discuss in detail the "three keywords" to understanding the survival of the underground faith in Japan. Essentially, they come down to (1) lay communities that had been organized for the governance of the Catholic faithful in diverse territorial regions of the country since the time of St. Francis Xavier's mission in Japan; (2) the prophecy of a martyred catechist that after seven generations, black ships would arrive and Catholic "confessors" with the authority to forgive sins would return to Japan; and (3) hope of forgiveness in the absence of sacramental Confession through the Tridentine provision that "reconciliation between the individual and God can be attained by true contrition."

In these far-from-ideal conditions, how these Japanese "hidden Christians" were able to preserve and sustain their faith at all is indeed an "Oriental Miracle."

[Hat tip to JM]